Takashi Murakami

Публикаций
7 208
Подписчиков
1,12 млн
Подписки
2 455
Род занятий:
Современный японский художник, живописец, скульптор и дизайнер
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
@lushsux now showing at Hidari Zingaro The show is crazy!
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
I still can not say like that... @kantorgallery
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
I love"Interstellar"
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
"Kids See Gost" Listning party at out of LA 2018 w @kerwinfrost . @kerwinfrost @hidden.ny
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
@tonari_no_zingaro started selling skateboards. @andyyyyne
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
First meet w @kerwinfrost at "Kids See Gost" Listening Party LA. & then & then! See you little bit Kerwin_san!
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
The motif is originally taken from the fish painted on Yuan Dynasty blue flower vase, but it took me a long time to digest it in my own way. The original imagery was so magnificent that it intimidated me; I couldn’t fully pull it into my own motif. But after exploring the more traditional themes in a series of paintings I started in 2011, such as the 100-meter-long Arhat painting and 25-meter-long painting of the immortals, I was finally able to digest the mode of the Yuan Dynasty China. I imagine this process to be something similar to how an actor might throw themselves into creating a historical role by gaining or losing weight and getting mentally ground down. But in any case I’m not adept at such a process and it took me over a decade to realize this painting. That is, with this work, I’m finally making good my promise to Larry. The painting is huge, at 3-meter high and 16-meter wide. After 11 or so years, I was able to finally return to my initial promise; it’s refreshing and regenerating. This work therefore truly represents the feeling of “gyatei, gyatei” in the title of the show.
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
On February 21st, I open my solo show, titled GYATEI2, at Gagosian Beverly Hills. The title of the show references the climactic mantra, “gyatei, gyatei, haragyatei, harasogyatei,” that comes at the end of the Heart Sutra. This phrase could be full of meaning or devoid of meaning—some say it imitates an infant’s cry and, when chanted loudly, signifies rebirth. One of the works I’d like people to pay attention to in this show is a large painting featuring fish. If I may say so myself, this piece is exquisitely done. How can I put it—it’s been my goal as an artist to make my mind completely blank and paint as though in daze, wandering randomly around the canvas, and this is a piece that I managed to complete in just such way. I feel very lucky about this work. And there’s a back story to this piece. When I first met Larry Gagosian at his uptown gallery in NY to discuss my getting represented by the gallery, I tried to promote myself by showing him an idea for this painting (it was actually an image of a jar) and telling him that I intended to make a large painting with this as the subject. Larry really liked the idea. I subsequently did come to be represented by Gagosian, but I wasn’t able to realize the fish painting for a long time. Before I became a contemporary artist, actually I used to almost exclusively paint fish—especially freshwater fish. To think about the reason why, I recall often going to a river with my father to fish and seeing what looked like professional fishermen catching grass carps and fish named Hypophthalmichthys molitrix or Hypophthalmichthys nobilis brought in from China that were more than 1-meter long, and being astonished. Neither my father nor I ever managed to catch big fish and we brought small fish or shrimp home to release in our backyard pond, but rather than such a pathetic memory, it seems that my awe of huge fish must have remained vividly in my mind. The fish I have painted, by chance, are enormous freshwater fish that must have grown in a big river in China. Continue
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
2月16日土曜日にカイカイキキギャラリーにて、トークショーをやります。 話す内容は今、熊本市現代美術館で開催中の僕のキュレーション展『バブルラップ』に関する事で、タイトルは「バブルラップ展を契機に、生活工芸辺りを考えてみる」です。 大平洋戦争敗戦後の日本の文化の中の芸術様式は、ドリルの様な捻れた様式のエネルギーで、ジリジリと進んできました。その中でも特異点であるバブル経済の真っ只中に産まれた表現は、ちゃんとしたカテゴリーとしてではなく、80年代と言ったボンヤリした時代感で括られていても、それがどう言った意味を持っていて何事であったか、は、具体的に語られていません。そして、そのバブル崩壊後のシュリンクした経済と、人心の反省状態の中での表現においても、バブルとの関係性は大きいはずなのに、誰一人気に留めている人など居ないかの様な、否、敢えて触れない様にしている様な節があります。 僕は『バブルラップ』展では、敗戦後の日本人が抱えた捻れの構造を紐解き、だから故に、今現在の表現に至っているのだ、と言う謎解きに着手したいと思います。 約20年前『スーパーフラット』の本の中で言った、「日本は世界の未来である(まぁ、悪い意味で)」と提唱し、期せずしてネット文化が世界のフラット化を実現させ、オタク的感性全盛期を迎えましたが、今後の文化は、オタクよりももっと内向的で、何でもかんでも反省を基盤とする文化様式となり、今回もまた、日本が先陣を切ってその反省文化を走っていると思われます。もちろんそんなにポジティブな意味ではないんですが、しかし、反省し続けても、表現はし続けているわけで。 楽観的であり過ぎたバブル期の心情から、一転した反省の季節への変遷と、その中でも見つけ出そうとする美の様式とは何か?生活工芸と言われるムーブメントは何処から来て何処へ行くのか?そこで脚光を浴びるべきは、実は目白にひっそりと店を構える古道具坂田の店主・坂田和實さんの店の在り方、生き方ではないか? そんな答え探しを『バブルラップ』と言う旗のもと行っていくキックオフが、熊本市現代美術館で行われている展覧会なのです。 それらを取り巻く文脈探しを、このトークショーで、やってみようと思います。 なお、熊本市現代美術館でも、3月2日、3日とトークショーを行いますので、情報詳細、追ってお伝えいたします。 安藤雅信(ギャルリももぐさ主宰) 菅野康晴(『工芸青花』編集長) 村上隆(バブルラップ展キュレーター/ アーティスト) 日時:2月16日(土)16:30〜19:00 入場料:1,000円 会場:カイカイキキギャラリー @kaikaikikigallery We will have a talk show, talk about "An Occasion for Contemplating Lifestyle Ceramics: In Light of the Bubblewrap Exhibition" (Speaking in just Janese. No translation in English. sorry about that) SPEAKERS Masanobu Ando -Galerie Momogusa- Yasuharu Sugano -Kogei Seika Editor in Chief- Takashi Murakami -Bubblewrap Exhibition Curator/Artist- —- Date: Feb. 16, Sat. 16:30-19:00 Entrance fee: ¥1,000 Location: @kaikaikikigallery Please check @kaikaikikigallery website for more details.
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
I went to "Lineage of Eccentrics: The Miraculous World of Edo Painting" show at Tokyo Metoropolitan Museum who created this Movement was Nobuo Tuji, he is my master, making it the highest peak of a Japanese art historian. This show was truly fantastic. @chiaki_kasahara_
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
Wow! How digging this photo! @hidden.ny
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
@complexcon CHICAGO kick off meeting in my studio in Long Island city.
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
Last night incident like a mirage! @bakerpr
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
When we came back to my studio long island city, me & @tatsuyayamasaki not have a key. How can we do? Out side is so cold!
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
@garage_magazine ivent at @galerieperrotin . @wherearetheavocados she gave me beautiful message. 🤩🤩🤩
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
Shaped canvas NEW work.
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
Inspiration from that.
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
Amazing! Amazing! Amazing! We have Collaboration! @wherearetheavocados × me × @garage_magazine & @mamasinthebuilding
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
@doraemonpost & my Flower colabo NEW Silkscreen prints ed 300. Sells at @tonari_no_zingaro soon.
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
4.8m×12m HUGE NEW painting.
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
Congrats! @alexandrearnault! @rimowa Flagship shop open on GINZA BEST Location & Beautiful interior!
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
I found @yuji____ueda piece. @klausbiesenbach
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
My new 17m painting need some music. This time @postmalone feeling! Thank you nice enagy!
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
バブルラップ 「もの派」があって、その後のアートムーブメントはいきなり「スーパーフラット」になっちゃうのだが、その間、つまりバブルの頃って、まだネーミングされてなくて、其処を「バブルラップ」って呼称するといろいろしっくりくると思います。特に陶芸の世界も合体するとわかりやすいので、その辺を村上隆のコレクションを展示したりして考察します。 ↑ ここまでが、展覧会の正式タイトルです。 以下、参加アーティスト A BATHING APE、青木亮、青島千穂、荒川朋子、荒木経惟、安藤雅信、庵野秀明、上田勇児、榎忠、榎倉康二、大竹伸朗、大谷工作室、岡崎乾二郎、尾形アツシ、小野哲平、ob、加藤泉、上泉秀人、川俣正、菊畑茂久馬、國方真秀未、熊谷幸治、くらやえみ、グルーヴィジョンズ、桑田卓郎、小出ナオキ、小嶋亜創、小林正人、小松崎茂、坂田和實(古道具坂田)、佐藤玲、佐内正史、JNTHED、篠山紀信、清水志郎、菅木志雄、空山基、タカノ綾、竹熊健太郎、蔦谷喜一、鶴野啓司、DIEGO、TENGAone、中西夏之、中原浩大、中村一美、奈良美智、成田亨、額賀章夫、浜名一憲、ハロシ、坂知夏、日比野克彦、ヒロ杉山/エンライトメント、HIROMIX、藤原新也、ボーメ、松下昌司、MADSAKI、三木富雄、Mr.、森岡成好、村木雄児、村田森、森村泰昌、山口はるみ、山田隆太郎、山本桂輔、指差し作業員、李禹煥、渡辺隆之 @chiaki_kasahara_
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
つづき、です。 (先日、美術評論家の、椹木野衣さんが、展覧会に合わせたレクチャーをしていただきました。その時のスナップ) で、僕はうつわ祥見あたりと、三羽烏と、そして当時、ブログ文化が台頭してきた時期で、そこに「うつわノート」という後に同名の、お 店をつく る松本武明さんのブログがあって、当時サラリーマンであったであろう彼が休みごとにいろんなお店を回って、作品を購入したり展覧会をレヴュー したりし て、その文脈にも僕個人は感化されていきました。 ポストバブルはとてもわかりやすく、貧しい文化であり、それは柳の民藝的な無名性を発端にして、しかし、ユーザーベース、しかも女性ユーザーに重点 を置く文 化になってゆき、それを批評するブログが出来て、僕の脳内においては、立派な日本の新文化の構造が成立しはじめていました。ですが、そもそも、起点として、柳の民藝があることが、どうにも居心地が悪いことに僕が気がついてしまい、、、、というか、他の生活工芸の人々 は、今も民藝を起点にして崇めているのですが、僕は、なんか違う!と思い始めたのです。 これって、バブル期のあの頃の文化、アメリカに追いつけ追い越せとなって、日本人のアイデンティティは発想の起点にはあんまりなっていな かったことへの違和感、、、と、柳の民藝って似てる気がしてきたのです。柳の民藝は、決して彼のオリジナルな目線だけではなく、あの当時、ピカソとかもハマっていた第三世界の再発見という、植民地主義的な上から目線の受け売りだったわけで、まぁ、柳自身も当時のブルジョア階級であった訳で、それを敗戦後の貧しく不勉強な輩が日本独自だとかありがたがりすぎてきた訳で、発祥地点における独自性は色あせ、上から目線を隠す巧妙な文章にも気がつけず、といったテイタラクを補完しているのが、坂田和實さんの古道具坂田であるという、なんとも奇妙な文化の継承劇であったりするのです。 坂田にしても、民藝は常に相対化される大事な経典であることに間違いはないにせよ、現代の情報が満載の時代においては、後生大事にされるには綻びが多すぎるわけで、そのへんの綻びを補完し、その理念を文章で残すのではなく、商いするお店の形で伝播していって、若手のクリエーターがフォローしてきた、というムーブメントが面白い。 そして、近年の坂田さんの最高にして究極のセレクションは、渋谷松濤美術館で展示した、坂田さんの展覧会に出展していた、2000年代初頭の中国深圳からセレクトした作業員のぼろぼろになったランニングシャツ、そこに見る、清貧の美の極致をして、見事、柳からの脱皮を図れた、、、否、それも また、植民地主義的な目線ではないのか?という問いもあるであろうが、そうではない。坂田さんの出自の敗戦後の左翼的な思想をベースにしつつも、ヒッピー的な自由なライフスタイルと共に、貧を美とするという揺るがぬ理念の投げかけにおいて、経済的に世界から取り残されはじめた日本における、オリジナルな美の理念の誕生とも言える。 バブル経済の前夜、日本の美術シーンには「もの派」という、まぁ、イタリアのアルテポーヴェラ=貧しい芸術、やら、アメリカのミニマリズ ム等と呼応するムーブメントがあって、同時多発的に発祥した芸術運動ですが、三羽烏の安藤さんなんかは、このもの派に当てられて、表現者になったと言っているぐらいで。で、そのもの派は、韓国から戦後の日本に入国してきた李禹煥が明文化した理念で持って起動していたわけで、にもかかわらず、日本 独自の文化としてアートシーンでは認識されており、しかし、戦後のどさくさや、日本と韓国、朝鮮との関係性を考えると、大変コスモポリタンなムーブメントであったのです が、これは、バブル経済の大波に一瞬さらわれてしまって、見えなくなって、しばらくなりを潜めてましたが、数年前アメリカで再発見され て、今は大きなジャンルになってるわけですが、その「もの派」があって「Superflat」があって、となって、間の抜け落ちをどうしたものかと。 「もの派」 「バブル経済と西武セゾングループ」 「Superflat」 「生活工芸」 「坂田の清貧の美」 となるわけです。 もの派の頃、貧しい芸術のアルテポーヴェラから端を発して、バブって、はじけて、貧しくなって、ぐるっとひと回りして、清貧に行き着いた、と。 それをくるむには、まさに陶芸を購入する際に使う、バブルラップのような、なんとも実体のない、いい加減な、しかし、機能的な梱包材をして包んで見れば、敗戦後のアレヤコレヤがまとまるのではないかと。特にバブル経済最盛期の表現が命名できなかった理由に、日本人の西欧コンプレックスの究極の裏返しの、日本人表現者特有の、我は日本人にしてあらず、コスモポリタンであるというネジ曲がったプライドが邪魔していたのではないかと推察するが、そのへんもやんわりと包んでしまえないかと。 それを「Bubblewrap」と、英字でネーミングしたいと思います。 で、この「Bubblewrap」は、そういう目論見の日本の美を検証するための展覧会なのであります。 村上隆(本展キュレーター) @chiaki_kasahara_
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
現在、熊本市立現代美術館で、『バブルラップ』という展覧会をキュレーションしています。(3月3日まで)しかし、美術館から、内容がよくわからないから、わかりやすいのに変えて欲しい、とのリクエストがあったので、サブタイトルとして、展覧会内容がわかるように、要素を全部書きました。僕としては「スーパーフラット」シリーズに次ぐ新シリーズの立ち上げなので、渾身のキュレーション展ではありますが、九州の熊本(東京羽田から飛行機で90分、空港から美術館まで、車で45分、と、かなり遠いです)なので、観に行って頂くとなると、ワザワザな感じになるので、此処で、展覧会を写真で報告します。 また、展覧会のステイトメントも書きましたので、転載します。是非、観に来ていただきたいと思います。 ★写真は展覧会の最後の部屋、もの派の作品と、古道具坂田のお店のレプリカがインスタレーションされてる状況です。 ■□■□■□■□ 僕が現代美術界で活動できている要因の一つに「Superflat 」の提唱者であるから、という事実があります。 ある一定期間に発表された文化的な事象をまとめてネーミングすることで、日本の人以外に簡易に説明可能なようにと思って、本の制作、そして展覧会をキュレーションをしました。 その一定期間とは、僕自身がデビューした頃としました。僕がデヴューする前、それは日本がバブル経済に浮かれていて、世界一の金満国家として数年間君臨していた時期で、その大波に僕は乗り遅れて、もし くは全く同期できなくて、いじけるような形で表現者としてのスタートを切らざるを得なかったのです。僕の乗れなかったバブル経済期の表現とはなにか?と、当時美大生だった僕の感覚を思い出すと、おしゃれで、アメリカンで自信に満ちてて、そして不良的に世の中を斜めに考えていたような、そういう気分でした。ああ、ファッションではコムデギャルソン、ワイズとかが一世を風靡し始めてて、日本もなかなか大したもんだ的な、気分でした。世界一の経済のうねりが街中に満ちていたわけですから、その余波で西武美術館とか、たくさんの洋物文化を輸入してくれていて、それを全部食べきろうと努力していたのが、僕の美大生時代、1980年代中頃でした。 しかし、そのバブル経済はなんだか知らないうちにガタガタと崩れて行き、西武セゾンもなんとなく元気がなくなってゆき、ああ、一つの時代が終わっ たなぁ、と思わざるを得なかったのです。同時に、その頃、パソコン文化が台頭してきて、圧倒的な文化の変革期が訪れました。 だから、僕はそのバブル崩壊を句読点として、ちがった文化が出てくるんだぞ!と「Superflat 」を唱えたのです。 そしてうまいこと「Superflat 」は海外のアートシーンで波を作れて、勢い余って「Superflat」シリーズと銘打って、「ぬりえ(coloriage)」展をカルティエ現代美術財団で「Littleboy」をNYのジャパン・ソサエティで行って、主に、バブル最盛期ではアングラであった、オタク文化方面をガンガン掘り下げて行きました。 で、時は過ぎてゆき、オタク文化もどんどんメジャー化、そして世界的な共通言語となってゆき、僕がたどたどしく、そのへんを語らずとも、というムードにもなってゆきました。 その間にも日本はどんどん貧しくなってゆき、その貧しさの中で、やりくりしながら元気に表現している集団を見つけたのです。それが生活工芸、というジャンルみたいで、そのへんのムーブメントとはなんぞや?と、よくわからないので、作品をどんどん購入しました。大衆 に向けた「買うことが可能」な価格帯での真剣な芸術。ある意味、オタク文化にも似ていて、発信先はあくまでも大衆なのです。 10年ほど、買い続けてきた頃、そのへんの作家さんたちの語る言葉が気になり始めてきました。表現をしてゆくクリエーターも、時として言葉が必要になります。 その彼らが拠り所としているのが、「民藝」を提唱した柳宗悦でした。その柳の理論を援用する形で、一軒の骨董屋、というか、骨董という概念からもこぼれ落ちた古道具、という呼称で商いをする「古道具坂田」というお 店の持つ、理念というか、方向性も若い表現者にとって寄る辺となっていました。店主の坂田さんが見つけてきて、お店に並べるものに関する美意識を、いかに咀嚼しようか、と、生活工芸三羽烏の、安藤雅信、赤木明登、内田鋼一の 三人の男性らが、その作品に、もしくは様々な媒体に書くエッセイに、精力的に理解の方向づけを行っていました。 その三羽烏もちょっと古いな、と思える頃、現代陶芸作家の作品を扱う陶芸商「うつわ祥見」が鎌倉あたりにほっくり商売を はじめ て、それと同時に本も刊行。「うつわ日和。」というオーナー祥見知生さんの本が発売され、そこには柳の民藝の理念を借り受けた作家の作品があるん だけれど も、男性的な理念闘争とは全く無関係に、器を愛せ、という情念的な方向性を打ち出し、それがなんだか、時代の変わり目そのものに見えた時期が ありました。 @chiaki_kasahara_ つづく
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
@cbssundaymorning @thaddeusdelonis
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
However, it was all engulfed by the Bubble Economy’s great wave and remained undiscovered for a while. But after a period of invisibility, it was rediscovered in America a few years ago, and Mono-ha has now become a major artistic genre. So, there was Mono-ha, and then there was Superflat. What of the gaps in between? It goes like this: Mono-ha The Bubble Economy and Seibu Saison (Sezon) Group Superflat Seikatsu Kogei (Lifestyle Crafts) Sakata’s “beauty of honest poverty” Mono-ha had Arte Povera, the art of poverty, as its starting point, and then things bubbled up; then the bubble burst, and then we became poor, finally circling back to the idea of “honest poverty." In order to encompass all of this, to wrap this all up, I thought we might need to use something like bubble wrap—which, coincidentally, is used to wrap ceramics. I believe that using the somewhat intangible, haphazard, yet functional packing material would be appropriate for encompassing the various incongruous aspects of post-war Japan. The reason the expressive forms of the bubble era’s peak were never named was the unexpected result of Japan’s complex towards the West: a complex unique to Japanese artists, a twisted sense of pride that claims, “I am not Japanese, but rather a cosmopolitan." This arrogance obstructed the era’s naming at the time, but I wonder if I might now somehow gently wrap everything up, the complex included. I would like to then label this bundle “Bubblewrap." And so, that’s the intention behind the exhibition, Bubblewrap, which examines the Japanese sense of beauty. Takashi Murakami (Artist and Curator) tihis is a END. @ikkiogata
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
And so Kazumi Sakata’s shop Furudōgu Sakata has been remedying and supplementing this woeful situation: what a truly strange succession of cultures. Although it is true that mingei is a key tenet relative to which many concepts may be examined, in the current age of abundant information, it is too frayed to be cherished preciously. Sakata augments and strengthens the frayed areas by—instead of preserving its ideas in new writing—propagating its ideology through a shop that does business, which then young creators started to follow. I found this movement fascinating. Mr. Sakata’s best and ultimate selection in recent years was shown in his exhibition at the Shoto Museum of Art; a worn-out hemp shirt owned by a Chinese worker in Shenzen in the early 2000s. By presenting the item’s sense of honest poverty as an acme of beauty, Mr. Sakata was able to successfully shed Yanagi’s limitations... Of course one may still ask, “Is this not also an imperialistic point of view?” but such a question is unwarranted. While the base of Mr. Sakata’s philosophy lies in the left-wing thinking of post-war Japan, it incorporates a free, hippy-ish lifestyle, and asserts its unwavering belief that poverty is beauty. It can be considered an innovative philosophy of beauty born in Japan, a country the world has now begun to leave behind economically. On the eve of the bubble era, a movement called Mono-ha emerged in the Japanese art scene in dialogue with other movements such as the Italian Arte Povera (literally, “poor art”) and American Minimalism; an art movement emerging concurrently with other art movements at the time. Mr. Ando, one of the seikatsu kōgei trio, even claims that he became an artist due to Mono-ha’s influence. And, even though Mono-ha was first established as a clear, independent principle by Lee Ufan, a Korean artist who immigrated to Japan after the war, the movement is still recognized in the art world as a uniquely Japanese cultural concept. In reality, if you take all of the post-war chaos and the complex Japan-South Korea-North Korea relations into consideration, Mono-ha was an incredibly cosmopolitan movement. Continue... @ikkiogata
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
The book, Utsuwa Biyori, by the gallery owner Tomoo Shoken, features works by artists influenced by Yanagi’s mingei philosophy. However, rather than a brute, masculine battle between ideologies, it promotes the passionate love for utsuwa (vessels). This seemed to me to represent a change in times. And so, there was Utsuwa Shōken, the “trio,” and the blog “Utsuwa Note”—written right when blog culture had begun its rise—by Takeaki Matsumoto, who later opened a store of the same name. He, who was mostly likely a salaryman at the time, would go around various shops on his days off, purchasing works and reviewing exhibitions. The context of this entire situation also influenced me personally. Post-bubble Japan is very easy to understand—it is a culture of the poor. It had its roots in the anonymity of Yanagi’s mingei, and as the culture started to center itself around the user/consumer—in particular, female users/consumers— blogs critiquing this culture started to appear. And so, in my head, a proper structure of a new Japanese culture was beginning to form. I started to realize, however, that the fact that Yanagi’s mingei was considered the starting point of all this didn’t sit well with me. To be clear, everyone in the seikatsu kōgei sphere still reveres mingei as its bedrock, but I felt as though something was amiss. I started to think my complicated feelings towards Yanagi’s mingei is similar to my unease with the culture of the Bubble Economy era, when Japan was so preoccupied with catching up to and surpassing America that it did not really use its Japanese identity as a source for inspiration. Yanagi’s mingei ideology is not entirely of his own invention. It is an iteration of the condescending, imperialist “re-discovery” of the third world, which Picasso, among others, was also absorbed in at the time. Yanagi himself was part of the bourgeois class. Yet after the war, the people—poor and lacking education—excessively celebrated his ideas as “uniquely Japanese” concepts. Its condescending tone—cleverly concealed by deft writing—remained unnoticed, and originality faltered where there should have been innovation. Continue... @ikkiogata
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
which, during the peak of the Bubble Economy, was an underground movement. As time went on, otaku culture made its way into the mainstream, eventually becoming a shared language around the world. Now, it no longer feels necessary for me to try and explain the culture, inadequately at that. Japan became increasingly poor in the meantime, and I found a group of creators that was still energetically expressing itself by finding ways to manage in this new-found poverty. Apparently they worked in the genre of seikatsu kogei (Lifestyle Crafts) and I didn’t really understand what the movement was about, so I started buying many of their works. It is serious art that can be purchased by the average consumer at a “buyable” price. Similar in a way to otaku culture, its target audience is always and only the general public. After continuously buying these works for about 10 years, something about the language these artists use in telling their stories started to pique my interest. Even such creators need words to express themselves from time to time. The cornerstone these artists keep referring back to is Sōetsu Yanagi (1889 - 1961), the founder of the Mingei (folk crafts) movement. There is also an antique shop, or rather, a shop that deals in furudōgu (literally, “old tools”)—weathered articles which most likely wouldn’t even be considered antiques—by borrowing from Yanagi’s theories, and the philosophy and directionality of this shop, named Furudōgu Sakata, has also attracted many young artists. There is an aesthetic sense to how the shop owner, Kazumi Sakata, finds these items and lays them out in his store, and the trio of players in the realm of seikatsu kōgei—Masanobu Ando, Akito Akagi, Koichi Uchida—attempted to digest this principle. These three men energetically promoted the advancement of its comprehension by making works or writing essays in various media. As the novelty of the trio began to wear off, Utsuwa Shōken, a gallery specializing in contemporary ceramic art, quietly began its business in Kamakura, and started publishing books as well. Continue... @ikkiogata
Такаси Мураками в Instagram - фото
Официальный инстаграм аккаунт Такаси Мураками
One reason I manage to be an active player in the contemporary art world is that I am the originator of Superflat. In order to make the cultural phenomena that occurred during a specific period in Japan readily explainable to a non-Japanese audience by collectively naming them, I published a book and curated exhibitions on the subject. The period in question I chose was around the time I debuted as an artist. Before then, Japan was in high spirits thanks to the economic bubble, reigning for several years as the most affluent country in the world. I had either missed out on or utterly failed to synchronize with this great wave, and had to start off my career as an artist pitying myself. When I reflect on the creative expressions of the so-called Bubble Economy era as I perceived them as an art school student, my impression was that they were trendy, American, filled with confidence, and had a cynical outlook on the world. With COMME des GARÇONS and Y's dominating the fashion sphere at the time, it seemed as though Japan was congratulating itself for becoming a big deal. The energy and effects of having the world's strongest economy had inundated the streets, and entities such as the Seibu Museum of Art rode that wave and imported many kinds of Western culture into Japan. In the mid-1980s, when I was an art student, we were doing our best to consume all things Western. Before we knew it, however, the Bubble Economy crumbled away. The Seibu Saison (Sezon) Group also began to lose its vigor, and I couldn't help sensing the end of an era. At the same time, the internet culture had emerged, marking the arrival of decisive cultural change. That is why I took the collapse of the Bubble Economy as a punctuation, presenting Superflat as a declaration that a new culture was about to arise. Superflat subsequently managed to create its own wave in the global art scene. Taking advantage of the momentum, I curated two more exhibitions, “Coloriage” at Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain in Paris and “Little Boy” at Japan Society in New York, to complete what I dubbed the Superflat Trilogy. In these exhibitions I primarily dug deep into otaku culture, @chiaki_kasahara_